Category Archives: Autism Videos at ACT

PBS – Working Together to Support Children and Families

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Supporting students with disabilities and their families takes a village, including a range of professionals who must collaborate if students and families are to be provided with seamless service.  The purpose of this presentation is to discuss strategies that professionals can employ to work collaboratively, across disciplines, to enhance outcomes for students with disabilities.

blankIlene Schwartz, PhD, BCBA-D, Professor and Chair, Special Education, University of Washington

Dr. Ilene Schwartz  is the Director of the Haring Center for Inclusive Education on the University of Washington campus, an interdisciplinary, research and training center focused on improving outcomes for children of all abilities. Her work focuses on autism, developing educational interventions for young children, and preparing staff to work with people with disabilities.

Dr. Schwartz has spoken to audiences around the world on topics such as “Understanding Autism”; “Why Inclusion is Important for all Children”, and “Getting an ‘A’ in ABA*”. Her TED talk, “The Power of Inclusive Education” has been viewed by thousands of people. Her recent book, “The Project DATA Model for Teaching Preschoolers with Autism**” describes her 20-year ground-breaking project designed to provide state of the art services for children with autism in public school settings. The Project DATA model is used across the country and internationally and is the standard of care for young children with autism in Washington State.


Part 1: Introduction and Objectives


Part 2: Meaningful Objectives, Inclusion, and the Four Non-Negotiables


Part 3: Non-Negotiable #1 – The Power of Positive Reinforcement


Part 4: Non-Negotiable #2 – Make Instruction Intentional


Part 5: Non-Negotiable #3 Rethinking Intensity – Embedded Teaching Strategies, Contingency Contracting, Environmental Arrangement, and Teaching for Independence


Part 6: Non-Negotiable #3 – Teach Students What to Do


Part 7: Non-Negotiable #4 – Data-based Decision Making


Part 8: Q & A

  • 0:00 – 2:32 You don’t have anecdotes listed as a type of data? Why is that?
  • 2:32 – 4:05 How do we keep visual schedules from taking up too much time?
  • 4:05 – 6:12 Do you have any suggestions for encouraging members of a team to collect data?
  • 6:13 – 7:06 How do you define keystone skills?
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Family Centred, Culturally Responsive PBS:  A Multi-Method Case Study

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Dr. Joseph Lucyshyn presents a multi-method study of family centered positive behavior support (FCPBS), designed to be culturally responsive to families raising a child with developmental disabilities. The presentation includes a definition of cultural competence and best practices in culturally responsive service delivery. Implications for behavior consultants working with families of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds are discussed. A fascinating case study demonstrates how the family was coached to use PBS strategies to transform their child’s ability to eat a nutritious diet and play with her sibling. There was a sustained positive effect on the family’s ability to develop other strategies to improve the child’s functional skills and to improve their quality of life.

Joseph Lucyshyn, PhD, BCBA-D, University of British Columbia

Dr. Joseph Lucyshyn is Associate Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education at UBC. A respected researcher, he has extensive experience working in collaboration with families and allied professionals to develop and implement family centered positive behavior support plans in home and community settings for children with autism and other developmental disabilities who engage in severe problem behavior. Dr. Lucyshyn has a particular interest in working with families from a variety of cultural backgrounds and how to ensure that they have access to culturally responsive PBS.

Dr. Lucyshyn’s Q&A can be viewed as part of the Providing Culturally Sensitive PBS to Families discussion page.

 

Part 1: The Need for Culturally Responsive PBS


Part 2: Culturally Responsive PBS with a Family of Taiwanese Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds


Part 3: Culturally Responsive PBS with a Family of Taiwanese Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds


Part 4: Qualitative Findings


Part 5: Culturally Responsive Practices, Cultural Humility, Study Limitations and Considerations for Future Research

 

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Providing Culturally Sensitive PBS to Families: Discussion and Q&A

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of ACT’s Positive Behavior Support Learning Stream

This panel was facilitated by Deborah Pugh, ACT – Autism Community Training’s  Executive Director. Prior to returning to Canada in the mid-90’s, Deborah worked as a journalist internationally, including six years living in Egypt. Since 2005, when ACT began its work providing family support, it has prioritized the needs of aboriginal and immigrant families in providing information resources, including ACT in Chinese and ACT in Punjabi, in addition to many language resources captured in the Autism Information Database.

Panel Participants

blankJoseph Lucyshyn, PhD, BCBA-D, Associate Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, UBC

Dr. Joseph Lucyshyn has extensive experience working in collaboration with families and allied professionals to develop and implement family centered positive behavior support (FCPBS) plans in home and community settings for children with autism and other developmental disabilities who engage in severe problem behavior. He has authored publications in peer-reviewed journals including the Canadian Journal of School Psychology, Journal of Child and Family Studies, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, and Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities

blankMariko Tachi, MEd, BCBA

Mariko Tachi has her BCBA and a Masters in Special Education from UBC. She has been providing in-home intervention based in ABA for children diagnosed with autism and their families in the Lower Mainland for the past decade. Since 2015, she has been travelling to Japan to provide interventions to families and has presented numerous workshops.

blankNoreen Dunn, MEd, BCBA

Noreen Dunn has been supporting children with ASD and other developmental disabilities in home, school, and community settings for over 13 years. A BCBA with a MEd in Special Education from UBC, Noreen has a keen interest in empowering and supporting families; she is currently working with a group of professionals in BC to make PBS more accessible to families from diverse cultural backgrounds.


Part 1: Q&A

 

  • 00:00 Do you ever find in your professional practice that you struggle with dealing with the black and whiteness of the ethical considerations when you’re trying to develop rapport with families from different cultures? For example, accepting tea?
  • 8:24 What do special needs approaches look like in Japan? Is it a similar PBS system compared to Canada/BC?
  • 10:19 What role can external professionals play in helping to bridge the gap in communications with schools?

Part 2: Q & A

 

  • 00:00 How can we teach cultural humility to professionals and school staff?
  • 04:23 Dr. Pat Mirenda discusses accepting tea for the purposes of cultural respect and sensitivity for BC ABA members.
  • 7:27 Is there research on if treatment is more effective if you speak the same language as the family you are working with?
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Providing Culturally Sensitive PBS to Families

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 19, 2018

Part of ACT’s Positive Behavior Support Learning Stream

Mariko Tachi and Noreen Dunn provide key components of culturally sensitive PBS, paired with personal and anecdotal examples. These include:

  1. Developing rapport informed by the family’s culture.
  2. Incorporating cultural beliefs, practices, and parenting practice into development of PBS.
  3. Incorporating the key stakeholder’s cultural beliefs when training for implementation.

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Mariko Tachi, MEd, BCBA; Parbs Bains, MEd, BCBA; Noreen Dunn, MEd, BCBA

Mariko Tachi has her BCBA and a Masters in Special Education from UBC. She has been providing in-home intervention based in ABA for children diagnosed with autism and their families in the Lower Mainland for the past decade. Since 2015, she has been travelling to Japan to provide interventions to families and has presented numerous workshops.

blankNoreen Dunn has been supporting children with ASD and other developmental disabilities in home, school, and community settings for over 13 years. A BCBA with a MEd in Special Education from UBC, Noreen has a keen interest in empowering and supporting families; she is currently working with a group of professionals in BC to make PBS more accessible to families from diverse cultural backgrounds.

blankParbs Bains is a BCBA with over 16 years of experience in the field of special education, supporting families in the home, school and community settings. She holds a MEd in Special Education from UBC. Parbs is a member of Umeed, an interdisciplinary group created to identify cultural and linguistic barriers facing families of individuals with autism in BC.


Part 1: Introduction – Need for Services in Increasingly Diverse Communities, Key Features of PBS with Families


Part 2: Collaborative Partnerships with Families


Part 3: Functional Assessment, Meaningful Lifestyle Outcomes, Multi-Component PBS Plan & Implementation Support


Part 4: Putting PBS into Practice, Learning about the Family’s Interaction and Communication Style


Part 5: Family Decision Making, Support Networks


Part 6: Child-Rearing Practices, Cultural Expectations, Roles and Responsibilities of Family Members

Community Resources:


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Positive Behavior Support in Schools – Discussion and Question period

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 19, 2018

Part of ACT’s Positive Behavior Support Learning Stream

blankThis panel discussion was facilitated by Nathan Ngieng, Director of Instruction for Learning Support Services with the Abbotsford School District, at the end of Day 1 of the conference. Mr. Ngieng has been active in school-wide Positive Behavior Intervention and Support throughout British Columbia for the past decade, providing training and support to several school districts through a Ministry of Education funded initiative with the Making Connections Committee. He begins by providing an overview of Day 1’s proceedings.

Panel Participants

Preetinder Narang, MEd, BCBA, Surrey School District

blankPreetinder Narang is a District Behavior Specialist and works as part of the District Action Team for Autism (DATA) in the Surrey School District. She has a Masters of Education in Developmental Disabilities with a Concentration in Autism and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA).  Ms. Narang is a PhD candidate in Developmental Psychology and Education at the University of Toronto and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, at the University of British Columbia.

Tina Gunn, MEd, BCBA, Surrey School District

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Tina Gunn is a District Behavior Specialist and works as part of DATA in the Surrey School District. She has a Masters of Education in Developmental Disabilities with a Concentration in Autism and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). She is a BC certified teacher and has provided behavioral and consultative services to children and youth with autism and developmental disabilities since 2009.

Watch Preetinder Narang & Tina Gunn’s presentation Tier 3 Interventions and Supports – Behavior Technician Training for Paraprofessionals.


Victoria Knight, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia

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Victoria Knight has more than 20 years of experience working with students who have ASD. Her research interests include applying principles and tactics derived from ABA to promote learning of academics, especially in the areas of STEM. Dr. Knight has published, presented, and trained educators in these areas internationally. 

Watch Dr. Knight’s presentation Membership, Belonging, and Development of “Soft Skills” within a PBS framework.


Ainsley Boudreau, PhD, R.Psych., BC Children’s Hospital

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Ainsley Boudreau is a staff Psychologist at BC Children’s Hospital and works in private practice at Cornerstone Child and Family Psychology Clinic. She has a Master’s degree in School Psychology, and a PhD in Clinical Psychology. Her research aims to advance treatment and other clinical work in neurodevelopmental disorders (primarily ASD and tic/Tourette disorders).

Watch Dr. Boudreau’s presentations on How Classmates Can Facilitate Positive Social Behaviors for Children with ASD and Treating Selective Mutism in Children with ASD.

Part 1: Introduction by Nathan Ngieng


Part 2: Q & A

 

  • 00:00 How can the Peer Pivotal Response Treatment Playgroup be implemented in a school setting?
  • 9:38 Where does the Surrey School District District Action Team for Autism (DATA) team travel?
  • 12:00 How are DATA para professionals selected for training?
  • 15:00 What are the other two domains of successful school inclusion?
  • 16:39 What variables would promote successful implementation of Peer Mediated PRT?

Part 3: Q & A

  • 00:00 How do we as parents advocate for school social skills, PRT programs?
  • 00:57 When there is a good fit with the student how long will the DATA trained para-professional continue wih that child?
  • 04:31 What kind of specialized skill set do you recommend for someone who wants to implement a PRT program?
  • 06:14 Using the PRT program for children six and over – what does it look like?
  • 07:46 What are the implications of continuing the PRT program over the summer?
  • 09:40 In light of the soft skill development and the importance of creativity with respect to coding is there ever a place where you introduce music?