Participating in Autism Research

Ongoing Autism Research – Volunteers Needed

Below is a listing of university affiliated research projects which autistic individuals, parents, and community professionals may be interested in exploring.

Researchers are invited to submit your research project using this online form. Submission may take up to one week to post. Please read your submission carefully, checking for spelling or other errors. ACT does not edit postings.

ACT reserves the right to request ethics approval for projects and not to post projects submitted.


Mental Health Service Provision with Autistic Adults: An Interpretive Description Study

Posted: June 2022
Project End Date: June 2022

Researchers at University of British Columbia want to learn from Autistic Adults and Mental Healthcare Providers separately about their experiences working together on mental health interventions and in mental health systems of care in Canada. This is a doctoral dissertation study led by researchers from the University of British Columbia School of Social Work and Department of Psychiatry Institute of Mental Health. 

If you are an autistic adult or mental health service provider in Canada, please consider participating in an online questionnaire where we will ask you about your experiences with mental health supports as an autistic adult or with autistic adults. This online questionnaire should take approximately 30 minutes to complete. Participants will have the opportunity to enter for a chance to win one of four $25 gift cards.

Contact Rae Morris at raemor@mail.ubc.ca for more information.


Exploring adaptation and resilience to parental stress in families of children (aged 2-18) on the autism spectrum

Posted: June 2022
Project End Date: June 2022

The Sladeczek Team for Applied Research (S.T.A.R.) at McGill University is recruiting parent* participants for a research project exploring adaptation and resilience to parental stress in families of children (aged 2-18) on the autism spectrum. Participants must be parents or other primary caregivers (*such as step-parents, grandparents, adoptive parents, etc.) who serve as guardian for a child (or children) between the ages of 2 and 18 who has been formally diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Participants will be asked to complete a short background questionnaire and participate in an interview with the principal investigator. The interview will take approximately 1 to 1.5 hours and be completed through a secure video conferencing platform (preferred), or by telephone, from the comfort of your home at a time of your choosing. Compensation: A $40 e-gift card (e.g., iTunes, Chapters, Walmart, Amazon, Toys R Us, or other family/child-oriented e-gift card) as compensation for their participation.

If you are interested or want more information, please contact: 604-404-5457 or gregory.davies@mail.mcgill.ca


Online Autism Study for BC Families

Posted: May 2022
Project End Date: June 2022

Researchers at Simon Fraser University want to understand why some kids get flagged for an autism assessment and others don’t. A new study is investigating whether camouflaging, which refers to hiding one’s autistic traits, is related to how people in a child’s life see the same child differently. The study also examines how this relates to different factors about the child, such as their gender, autistic characteristics, and mental health.

Researchers are looking for Parents/Guardians of autistic kids aged 8 to 12 who live in BC. Parents/Guardians will be asked to fill out an online survey about their child that takes about 15 minutes to complete. They will then receive an email directly from a survey publisher to complete another 15 minute online survey. The study will take 30-60 minutes to complete in total. The researchers will also be inviting the child’s teacher to participate and complete a 15 minute online survey. Participants will be entered into a draw for one of ten $20 Visa gift cards with a one in five chance of winning.

For more information, please contact Hilary Aime by email at hastudy@sfu.ca. To participate now, click here


Using Eye-Tracking Technology and Machine Learning to explore the possible specific Affinity between Youth, Autism and Manga as a visual Language

Posted: May 2022
Project End Date: On-going

Researchers at the University of British Columbia are looking for people ages 13-17 who are neurodiverse (autistic) and neurotypical to participate in eye-tracking while reading Manga (a Japanese comic). This study will provide some of the first research to ascertain if there is any affinity to manga by youth with autism, and to appreciate if there are differences in how youth read manga. If there are differences this can lead to a further understanding of the cognitive impact of autism on reading, including areas of novel research, allow for potential objective measure for diagnostic purposes, and use of manga in for communication or intervention. 

The study takes about 20 minutes and will be at UBC. Participants will receive a $20 honorarium and UBC parking will be reimbursed. Anyone who is interested can sign via the registration form here.

Contact sstarkie@student.ubc.ca or 604-423-4803 for more information.


Two-part survey study: Sticky Thinking & Mental Health in Autistic Adults

Posted: May 2022
Project End Date: December 2022

Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) are recruiting autistic adults for a quantitative online survey study examining the relationships between sticky thinking (repetitive thinking), repetitive behaviors, and mental health.

Participants must be aged 18+  and identify as autistic or as having autism; they can be from anywhere in the world as long as they understand English. Participant requires the completion of two separate 30 minute online surveys two weeks apart. View the study flyer for more information.

If you are interested in participating in this study or have any questions, contact Elliot Gavin Keenan at egkeenan@ucla.edu.


Codesigning and evaluating the usability of a workplace disclosure tool for Canadian youth and young adults on the autism spectrum

Posted: April 2022
Project End Date: June 2022

Researchers at the University of Toronto looking for Canadian youth and young adults on the autism spectrum to help codesign and provide feedback on a prototype (early draft) of an online workplace disclosure decision-aid guide and planning tool. The tool aims to help autistic youth and young adults navigate the complex disclosure decision-making process at work. They want to know if participants found the tool useful, easy to use, liked or disliked it, and if anything needs to be added, changed, and/or removed.

Potential participants must be between the ages of 15-29, have paid work experience or are looking for / interested in working, and have access to internet and a tech device to participate. For this study, participants will be sent a link and password to download and review the online tool. They must review the tool once to participate in the study. This should take participants at least 30 minutes. They will then participate in a 2-hour, online, interactive session using Zoom and Slido platforms with other youth and young adults on the autism spectrum to answer questions about the tool. Participants will receive an e-gift-card of their choice and can also receive volunteer hours as a token of appreciation for participating.

For more information, please see the study flyer or email Vanessa Tomas at vanessa.tomas@mail.utoronto.ca.


AutismBC Survey: Family Connections Centres and Your Child on the Autism Spectrum

Posted: April 2022
Project End Date: August 2022

On October 27th, 2021, the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) announced changes to the Children and Youth with Support Needs (CYSN) Framework. Existing programs like Individualized Autism Funding will be phased out and replaced by Family Connections Centres (or “hubs”). These changes are expected to be fully in place by 2025. Following the announcement of these changes, parents and caregivers of children on the autism spectrum – like you! – wanted the opportunity to share their thoughts, perspectives, reactions and potential concerns.

This survey offers a platform for parents and caregivers of children on the autism spectrum to have their voices heard. AutismBC will use the data collected through this survey to prepare a report that will be submitted to the BC government and made widely available in the summer of 2022.

Click here to access the survey.


Parent Experiences of the Primary to Secondary School Transition for Their Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Posted: April 2022
Project End Date: August 2022

Researchers are University of British Columbia are seeking parent/guardians of teens with autism spectrum disorder who transitioned to mainstream secondary school in British Columbia to participate in a study and share your experiences. Through your participation in this study, the hope is to add to existing research on transition planning and processes to better identify factors that help this period of change for children with ASD and for their families. The results of this work may help organizations to change policies or revise services for children on the autism spectrum as they transition between school environments.

Participation in this study is strictly voluntary and you can withdraw at any point without penalty. Anonymity and confidentiality will be upheld. This is an online survey, which will take between 40-60 minutes. Participants will be put in a draw to win a $25 amazon gift card. If interested or you would like to know more, click here to learn more.


Study on video games, music and Autism

Posted: April 2022
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at the University of Montreal are evaluating the effect of video games on children’s rhythmic abilities and cognition. The game is a mobile app for tablet and smartphone. Participants should meet these criteria:

  • Age between 7-13 years old.
  • Understand English and/or French.
  • Be non-musician (have less than two years of formal musical training).
  • Have a normal sight and hearing (or corrected to normal).
  • Have an ASD diagnosis, without comorbidities (mention this in email).
  • Live anywhere in Canada

$50 compensation is provided for your child’s participation, which includes: playing an entertaining game on tablet from home (2h30/week for 2 weeks), plus two sessions of video conference (about 90 & 45 minutes each) to help prepare for the game and complete questionnaires and online tasks.

Please contact the research team to to confirm your eligibility by email at asdmusicgames@gmail.com.


Assessing feasibility and effectiveness of an online parent resource to support safe and active sport and recreation for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Posted: March 2022
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at the UBC Okanagan School of Nursing are looking for individuals to provide input for developing and testing an online training resource for supporting parents raising a child on the autism spectrum. The researchers have developed this online survey to gather input from both parents of children on the autism spectrum as well as service providers about their interests and preferences about different types of safety related information and format for web-based resources. The main goal of this study is to develop and evaluate a website pertaining to safety issues for children on the autism spectrum and provide resources for families and recreation personnel to support active and safe recreation participation. 

The survey takes approximately 10 minutes to complete: Parent/Provider Online Survey

Contact Dr. Lise Olsen at lise.olsen@ubc.ca or see the study poster for more details.


Teachers’ perspective on the student-teacher relationship in female students with autism spectrum disorder

Posted: March 2022
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at the University of British Columbia are investigating teachers’ perspective on the student-teacher relationship quality with elementary-aged female students with autism spectrum disorder. The study is looking for current or previous elementary-school teachers to complete a 15-minute online survey. Participants are eligible to participate if they have taught in the past three years an elementary school-aged female students with ASD, were a full-time teacher at the time in a mainstream/inclusive school, taught within Canada, and are proficient in English. As a thank you for participating, participants will be given a chance to enter a draw to win one of ten $20 gift cards.

Contact Melissa Lazo at melilazo@student.ubc.ca for more information.


Aging and Autism

Posted: February 2022
Project End Date: December 2026

Researchers at Hollandview Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation are looking for adults, aged 40 years and older, who have an ASD diagnosis, with normal or corrected-to-normal vision and hearing, to participate in a study on aging. The purpose of this study is to understand how aging happens to develop better supports for autistic adults. What’s involved? You will be asked to answer questionnaires, undergo cognitive assessments, and have brain scans. Participation involves two sessions: one initial session and another after 4 years. Participants will receive $100 per study session as reimbursement. You can also request the results of your testing.

For information or to participate, contact Daman Rehal at drehal@hollandbloorview.ca.


Everyday Experiences and Communication

Posted: December 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at Western University are interested in what people know about common events and how people communicate. They are looking for autistic and non-autistic adults and children to participate in an online study.

Who can participate?

  • Adults (18 and older) who are autistic or non-autistic
  • Children (aged 9-17) who are autistic or non-autistic, and their parents/guardians
  • Participants must be English speakers.

What is involved?

The study has three parts: 1. Filling out personality/behaviour questionnaires. (For children under 18, this would be completed by a parent or guardian.); 2. Completing a task about ordering the steps people do during common events (like going to the movies); 3. Having a Zoom call for language and knowledge tasks with the researcher.

Participants will answer questions about words, sentences, and pictures. A device with a reliable internet connection would be needed for the study. In total, the study may take up to 3 hours. Participants will be given $30 CAD for participating in the study. If you (or your child) want to participate or have questions, please email Kara Hannah at khannah6@uwo.ca.


The Association between Interventions and Quality of Life in People with Autism

Posted: December 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Walden researchers are seeking to determine the relationship between the interventions used by people with autism and their quality of life and mental health. The association between interventions used, such as social skills, mental health, behavioral interventions, daily living skills, mindfulness, and medications, and quality of life and mental health of people with autism will be evaluated. Results from this study will help guide prioritizing those interventions which matter most to people with autism to help them achieve a more fulfilling life.

This study seeks volunteers who are:

  • Adults with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis 18 years of age and older without an intellectual disability (ID); OR
  • Parents/caregivers of adults with ASD 18 years of age and older without intellectual disability (ID) who are willing to complete the study survey on behalf of their child.

This study will involve completing the following steps:

  • Completing an anonymous online survey which will take about 15 minutes to complete
  • A $10 gift card will be provided to all participants who complete the study survey

If you are interested in participating in the study survey, please click the link below: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Autsurvey. Question can be sent to Taline Movsessian at taline.movsessian@waldenu.edu.


Executive Functioning and Math Performance of Adolescents

Posted: December 2021
Project End Date: June 2022

Researchers at Memorial University are recruiting autistic adolescents to participate in a study investigating the impact which executive functioning abilities have on math performance. Participants must be within the 12- to 18-year age range, attending school, and have a diagnosis of autism. Individuals with a math-based learning disability (i.e., dyscalculia) are not eligible to participate. Testing will take place remotely and online via a computer, through a one-on-one session with the primary researcher via Zoom virtual communication. Participants will complete an electronic survey comprised of a number of cognitive tasks measuring general intellectual ability (Raven’s 2, Raven et al., 2018), math performance, and executive functioning capacities. The survey will take approximately 50 minutes to complete. Parents will need to sign a written consent form and complete a demographic questionnaire before their child can participate. Participants will be entered for a chance to win one of ten $50 gift cards.

If you are interested in participating with your child, please contact the primary supervisor Nicole Eddy at neddy@mun.ca for more information.


Research Study About ASD and Parenting

Posted: November 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Are you the parent of a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder aged 13-45? Researchers at Vanderbilt University want to know more about you and your relationship with your child. This online study includes completing a consent form, two online questionnaires that will take about 30 minutes, and a short 10-minute recorded Zoom interview with a Vanderbilt student to find out more about you and your child. There is no payment but researchers will send study results when complete in a short feedback report.

For more information contact Elizabeth Roof at 615-343-3330 or Elizabeth.roof@vanderbilt.edu.


How Families of Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Describe “Navigational Services”

Posted: November 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Families of children and youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities often struggle to connect to fragmented services and supports. Researchers at the University of British Columbia are conducting a study to gain a better understanding of how families perceive services that connect them to community-based services, supports, and resources. In other words, we are interested in the concept of ‘navigation’ and related activities.

Any family member who engages, or hopes to engage, with navigation or navigation-related services for their child(ren) with neurodevelopmental disabilities are invited to participate. Examples of such navigation might be:

  • Connecting to assessment and developmental supports in the early years;
  • Navigating transitions into and out of school;
  • Navigation through healthcare settings, and connecting to appropriate healthcare providers;
  • Obtaining mental health support;
  • Finding peer supports

Participants to complete an online survey that will take 10-15 minutes. If you are interested in participating in this study, please click on this link to access the survey. If you have any further questions, please contact: emily.gardiner@cw.bc.ca.


Game-based cognitive intervention for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Posted: November 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

The University of Victoria Child Development Lab is currently conducting a study comparing game-based cognitive interventions for children with autism. The purpose of this research is to determine whether children can benefit from a cognitive intervention to improve their abilities to focus, remember, and self-regulate.

In this study, caregivers will have a role as their child’s interventionist and support their development of attention and executive functions through a parent-delivered intervention. Children will play one of two game-based interventions 3-to-4 times per week over 6 weeks with one of their caregivers supporting them. Each session will last approximately 30-45 minutes. Caregivers will receive training on how they can support their child in completing the sessions and the research team will be available to help you should questions arise. This research opportunity is currently open to children ages 4 to 8 years old who are diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (or who are waiting to get assessed for Autism Spectrum Disorders) and their caregivers.

For more information or to participate, contact Buse Bedir at macounlab@uvic.ca.


Aging and Autism

Posted: November 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at Hollandview Bloor are looking for adults, aged 25 years and older, who have an ASD diagnosis, with normal or corrected-to-normal vision and hearing, to participate in a study on aging. The purpose of this study is to understand how aging happens to develop better supports for autistic adults.   

What’s involved? You will be asked to answer questionnaires, undergo cognitive assessments, and have brain scans. Participation involves two sessions: one initial session and another after 4 years. Participants will receive $100 per study session as reimbursement. You can also request the results of your testing.

For information or to participate, contact Daman Rehal at drehal@hollandbloorview.ca.


The Chinese Immigrant Experience of an Autism Diagnosis

Posted: September 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers from the University of Calgary are conducting a study to learn about the first-hand experiences of Chinese immigrants who have been diagnosed with autism in Canada. The purpose is to better understand the perspectives of the immigrant community in Canada who have undergone a developmental disability diagnosis, as well as using the information to develop strategies and/or provide insight for professionals and clinicians who are considering diagnosing a Chinese individual with autism. This study is conducted entirely online.

To participate in this research project, you must:

  • Be aged 16 years or older, up to 35 years old.
  • Be an immigrant of Chinese descent who is now living in Canada.
  • Have autism, including Asperger syndrome, or are actively in the process of obtaining a formal diagnosis in Canada
  • Be verbally fluent, and understand a sufficient level of English or Mandarin Chinese
  • Be able to provide informed consent.

Participation involves a short online demographic survey (in either English or Chinese), filling out online consent forms and an online (Zoom) interview about your experiences of receiving an autism diagnosis. The interview should take about 1 to 1.5 hours of the participant’s time. All participants will receive a $25 gift card of their choice.

If you would like more information about the study or are interested in participating, please contact Cecilia (Qian Qian) Ye at qqye@ucalgary.ca.


Challenges and Facilitators During Transition to Adulthood of Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities

Posted: July 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at Dalhousie University are conducting a project investigating challenges and resources during transition to adulthood of adolescents with disabilities. The purpose of this project is to uncover barriers and factors that ease the transition to adulthood of adolescents with disabilities from perspectives of youth with disabilities, their parents, and service providers. What we mean by services includes broad spectrum of resources including education, employment, healthcare services, etc. The goal of this study is to have a better understanding of services and resources that are available to support the process of transition to adulthood for young people living with disabilities.

Participation will require involvement in an interview either face to face or over phone or via Skype, whichever is convenient, to share ideas and perspectives. Participants will also be asked to answer some basic questions describing themselves through a confidential online survey platform or filling out paper-based demographic survey. Participation in this study is completely voluntary and participants may choose to stop participating at any time prior to, during, or after the interview. A gift card (e.g., Amazon, based on your choice), valued at $30 will be provided for participant, even if they discontinue participation during the interview process. 

If you choose to participate in this study or have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact the research team at via email at resasd@dal.ca.


Investigating Depressive Symptomatology in Adolescents with ASD and ADHD

Posted: May 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at Queen’s University are conducting a study of the overlapping symptoms between depression and developmental disorders such as ASD and ADHD. Adolescents both with and without depression, and with and without ASD or ADHD, are invited to participate, along with their parent.

The child will be asked to complete a questionnaire about their feelings over the last two weeks. This will take approximately 30 minutes. The parent will also be asked fill out a questionnaire about how they believe their son/daughter has been feeling over the past two weeks and his/her behavior. This should take approximately an hour. If the parents feels that this would be too challenging for their child, their portion can be skipped, with only the parent completing the questionnaire. For their participation, parent and child will each receive a $10 Amazon e-gift card.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the study will be taking place over Zoom, a video conferencing program. If you and your child are interested in participating in the study, please reach out to asd.studies@queensu.ca for more information.


 

Social inclusion among individuals with autism spectrum disorder: How to advance their resilience

Posted: March 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

This Dalhousie University study will explore resilience and stress experienced by families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Researchers are also interested in understanding the strategies families and children use to cope with challenges, as well as available resources and gaps in services to promote family’s resilience. Participants must be: persons living with ASD (above 15 years), a guardian/parent of a person with ASD, or a healthcare service provider of young people living with ASD. Participants will speak with a member of the research team during a 60-minute individual interview either over phone or via Skype, whichever is convenient, to share ideas and perspectives. By participating in this interview, participants will be given a gift card (e.g., Amazon, based on your choice), valued at $30.

If you are interested, contact Dr Ghanouni at resource@dal.ca.


The Quality of Life of Older Adults on the Autism Spectrum

Posted: February 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

This University of West Alabama study will explore the experiences of older autistic adults (aged 50 years and older). Because of the understanding that there is no universal experience for anyone or any identity, and the lack of awareness about experiences of older adults, the study asks, “What are your social, emotional, mental, and physical quality of life experiences?” There are three parts of the study, a demographics survey, a quality of life assessment developed for those of us that identify as on the autism spectrum, and a quality of life interview with the main research conductor. Interviewees choose the mode of communication for the interview and will be compensated for completion of the study. Benefits also include having your experiences of quality of life shared.

If you are interested in participating in the study, please contact Rachel Colston at colstonr@uwa.edu for more information.


Body Image in Adolescents with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

Posted: February 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Many people with autism experience feeding and eating problems (e.g., picky eating, sensitivity to food textures, eating disorders), but it is not fully understood why. Body image (how someone thinks and feels about their body) plays an important role in eating disorders. This University of Calgary study aims to understand how teenage females with autism experience body image compared to their peers without autism. We will also examine how body image impacts eating and weight-control behaviours (e.g., dieting, exercise) in teens with and without autism.

Teenage girls (aged 12-17) and a parent/guardian will be asked to complete a brief phone screening and fill out online questionnaires about their eating behaviours, thoughts, and feelings about their body. As a thank you for participating, families will be entered into a draw for 1 of 30 $40 gift cards upon completion of the study.

If you are interested in participating in the study, please contact Jessica Baraskewich at enhancelab@ucalgary.ca for more information.


Autistic Adults’ Perspectives on Education and Intervention Services

Posted: January 2021
Project End Date: Ongoing

Often intervention and education for autistic children is designed and implemented without any input from autistic individuals themselves. This is why researchers in the Department of Education at UC Santa Barbara are recruiting autistic adults to participate in a study in which they will be asked to give feedback on different aspects of common intervention programs for autistic children. The study consists of an online survey that will take approximately 20-45 minutes to complete. The survey includes five short video clips of young children participating in intervention and a list of statements about common intervention goals and strategies. Participants will be asked to provide their opinions about these items. The videos might make some participants feel anxious, distressed, or frustrated. If this is the case, participants can choose to stop participating at any point during the study.

Potential participants must be autistic and be at least 18 years old.

If interested, please visit this website.

For questions, please contact graduate student researcher Rachel Schuck at rkschuck@ucsb.edu.


Development of an Artificial Intelligence Chatbot for Families of Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Posted: October 2020
Project End Date: Ongoing

Researchers at the University of Alberta are attempting to improve the life outcomes of families affected by Neurodevelopmental Disorders by developing a chatbot. The verification of engagement strategies used in the Chatbot is critical to improve families’ experiences with the application. The research team is currently in the process of running Focus Groups that are one-time 45~60-minute online sessions with 1-4 other individuals. Parents who have a child with Neurodevelopmental Disorders are invited for these focus groups. They will answer questions about their preferences for specific engagement strategies and converse with other participants in a Zoom meeting format.

For more information, please see the Study Flyer. If you are interested in participating, please contact Mahdieh Yousef at camibot@ualberta.ca.


Psychological Impact of COVID- 19 Pandemic and Experience: An International Survey

Posted: September 2020
Project End Date: Ongoing

You are being invited to take part in a research study exploring the psychological impact of the coronavirus, its effect on our emotions, behaviour and wellbeing. Using a survey conducted by Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust and Portsmouth University and in collaboration with the University of Victoria, the aim is to explore what factors support an individual’s wellbeing and what might have a negative impact in such unprecedented times. Responses will build a picture and enable better understanding about how the current pandemic is affecting people and ensure we identify gaps in response. The information will help planning future support, services and clinical research. It will also help key stakeholders in preparing for future infectious diseases or pandemics.

If you decide to take part in the study, you will be asked to complete a consent form and the online survey questionnaire that will take about 15 minutes to complete. You can access these by clicking here.

For more information, please see If you are interested in participating or would like more information, please contact local investigators Dr. Brianna Turner briannat@uvic.ca or Dr. Theone Paterson tpaterson@uvic.ca.


Canadian Parents’/Guardians’ Perspectives about the Impact of COVID-19 School Closures on Students Special Educational Needs

Posted: June 2020
Project End Date: Ongoing

This study is intended for the parent(s) or guardian(s) of children/youth with a special educational needs who are registered in school, and who have been affected by school closures due to COVID-19. Seeking feedback from you about your child’s experience, and your experience as a parent/guardian during school closures due to COVID-19. Specifically, exploring the strategies and supports that are effectively meeting students’ and parents’/guardians’ needs, and the strategies and supports that require improvement to allow governments to use this information to provide policy.

Visit the survey here.


Research Opportunity for Parents Who Completed PEERS

Posted: June 2020
Project End Date: Ongoing

Are you a parent who has participated in PEERS? This study is looking for parents who have completed the PEERS program within the last three years who are interested in talking about their experience with PEERS. The study is hoping to learn about ways to improve interventions for parents of adolescents with autism and to determine how to best address parent’s needs.

Parents will be asked to complete a 45 to 90-minute confidential online interview using zoom. Participants will be asked questions about their experiences throughout the PEERS intervention, including which things about their experience were helpful, which were less helpful, and what experiences would have been helpful. Participants who take part in the study will be provided with a $25 gift card as an appreciation for their time.

This study is being conducted by Brittni Thompson as part of her Master’s thesis under the supervision of Dr. William Mckee at UBC. If you are interested in participating in this study, please contact Brittni Thompson at brittni.thompson@alumni.ubc.ca.


“Autism in Practice”: Establishing, Maintaining, and Understanding Friendship Among Adults Diagnosed with Autism in British Columbia

Posted: April 2020
Project end date: Ongoing

This study focuses on how adults in the BC Lower Mainland, who are diagnosed with autism establish and maintain friendships. To participate in this study, you must be: At least 18 years old, diagnosed with autism, live in the BC Lower Mainland. The study includes two parts, face-to-face interviews as well as participation in some of the activities that you engage in with friends (the latter is optional). However, during COVID-19 outbreak, only online activities will be used, and you will be asked to participate in phone or video interview (Zoom, FaceTime, Skype). Your participation is entirely voluntary. All of your responses and the information that you provide in this interview will be confidential. You will be offered a $35 Amazon gift card for your participation in the interview. Review the study flyer for more information. Liking or sharing this invitation may identify you as a research participant. Review the Study Flyer for more information. Liking or sharing this invitation may identify you as a research participant.

If you are interested in participating in this study, please contact Jad Brake at jad.brake@alumni.ubc.ca or 778-927-3111. If you have additional questions, you may also contact the Principal Investigator for this study, Prof. William McKellin, Department of Anthropology, w.mckellin@ubc.ca or 604-822-2756.


Family Experiences, Motherhood, and Neurodevelopment Study

Posted: April 2020
Project end date: Ongoing

Students from the Family and Developmental Psychopathology Lab at the University of Manitoba are investigating several areas of the parent-child relationship and family functioning among parents of children with ASD. Specifically, this study examines the broad autism phenotype (BAP), parental reflective functioning (PRF), and parenting styles amongst parents of children with ASD and their relationship to parenting stress, parenting outcomes, child externalizing behaviours, and family quality of life (FQOL). Mothers of children with or without ASD, between the ages 6 to 11, are asked to complete a survey to investigate the strengths of these families. If you are interested in taking part in this study, please click the follwing link that will lead you to a survey that will take approximately 30-45 minutes to complete: Mothering and Neurodevelopment Study.

Please contact Olivia Cadieux at cadieuxo@myumanitoba.caif you have questions.


Social Stressors in Childhood – Are We Asking The Right Questions?

Posted: February 2020
Project end date: Ongoing

The Anxiety Stress and Autism Program (ASAP) at University of British Columbia is currently recruiting for a study exploring stressful childhood experiences and how best to ask about those experiences in research. Their goal is to determine if a new measure of stressful life events is easy to use and captures the experiences of teens and young adults with and without autism. We’re recruiting teens and young adults (ages 14-22 years) with and without autism and their parents. Participants will complete an online measure and then a feedback interview 2 weeks later at our lab. The survey will ask about past stressful experiences and if they still bother you or your child. We will also ask some questions about your or your child’s current feelings and behaviors. Participants with autism will be asked to complete an interview and observation about social interaction.

If you are interested in participating in this study, please contact Connor Kerns at asaplab@psych.ubc.ca.