Category Archives: Autism Videos at ACT

WTF – What’s the Function?

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 19, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Problem behaviors are one of the greatest barriers to student learning and is a significant problem for school staff and parents alike. Understanding why they occur is critical to developing preventative and educative solutions in-order-to benefit students and those who support them. These videos will dispel myths about why students engage in problem behaviors and teach participants about the four functions of behavior.

Richard Stock, PhD, BCBA-D , Capilano University

Richard Stock, PhD, BCBA-D is a full-time faculty member in the Applied Behavior Analysis – Autism Department at Capilano University.  He has provided  behavioral/educational consultative services to children and youth with ASD and other developmental disabilities in home, school and community settings since 1999.

Dr. Stock teachers courses in Ethics, Behavior Principles, Clinical Applications of ABA, Instructional Methods, and the Conceptual Analysis of Behavior. In addition to his work at Capilano University, he also teaches graduate courses in ABA as an Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario and Adjunct Faculty at UBC. 

 

 

Part 1: Introduction


Part 2: Breaking the Cycle of Problem Behavior


Part 3: Problem Behavior in the Past


Part 4: Potential Negative Effects of Punishment


Part 5: Functions of Behavior


Part 6: Name That Function! – Identifying the function of problem behavior


Part 7: Conclusion and Q&A


Practical Ways to Decrease Challenging Behaviors in School, Home and Community Settings

Filmed at ACT’s Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community– October 19, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel, respected internationally for her research and clinical practice, discusses various intervention procedures for decreasing challenging behaviors. The emphasis is on Positive Behavior Support procedures that are coordinated, multi-component, and systematically implemented throughout the day. Dr. Kern Koegel also provides many example of how challenging behaviors can be avoided in the first place. This presentation will appeal to both professionals and families for its reliance on important research as well as respect for individuals with autism and challenging behaviors.

Lynn Kern Koegel, PhD, CCC-SLP, Clinical Professor, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, California

Dr. Kern Koegel has been active in the development of programs to improve communication in children with autism for over 40 years. In addition to her published books and articles in the area of communication and language development, she has developed and published procedures and field manuals in the area of self-management and functional analysis that are used in school districts and by parents throughout the United States, as well as translated to other major languages.

Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel is the co-author of “Overcoming Autism: Finding the Answers, Strategies, and Hope That Can Transform a Child’s Life ” and “Growing Up on the Spectrum: A Guide to Life, Love, and Learning for Teens and Young Adults with Autism and Asperger’s”, published by Viking/Penguin. Dr, Kern Koegel and her husband, Robert Koegel, are the developers of Pivotal Response Treatment, which focuses on motivation. The Koegels have been the recipients of many awards, including the first annual Children’s Television Workshop Sesame Street Award for “Brightening the Lives of Children”, the first annual Autism Speaks award for “Science and Research” and the International ABA award for “enduring programmatic contributions in behavior analysis.”

 

Part 1: Introduction to PBS for Challenging Behavior


Part 2: Functional Behavior Assessments, Assessing the Curriculum


Part 3: Developing Meaningful Activities, Priming


Part 4: Re-Direction, Giving warning, Using Strengths, Physical Exercise, Systematic Desensitization, Coordination Across Environments, Parent Education


Part 5: Summary and Q&A


Setting Priorities for Future Research – A Panel Discussion

Panel presentation introduced and moderated by Dr. Anthony Bailey Chair of Adolescent and Child Psychiatry, University of British Columbia

Filmed at ACT’s 14th Annual Focus on Research Conference – April 4, 2018

Part 1: Introduction & Carly Erikson

Carly Eirikson – Provincial Outreach Program for Autism and Related Disorders (POPARD), B.C.

Carly Eirikson currently works as an Education and Behaviour Consultant for POPARD and as an instructor for the Richmond Educational Assistant Program. She completed a M.Ed. in Autism and Developmental Disorders from the University of British Columbia and has worked as a Resource Teacher and an elementary classroom teacher.


Part 2: Dr. Rene Jamison

Dr. Rene Jamison – University of Kansas, USA

Dr. Rene Jamison is an Associate Professor and licensed psychologist in pediatrics at the Center for Child Health and Development (CCHD), University of Kansas Medical Center.


Part 3: Vivian Ly

Vivian Ly – Autistics United Canada

Vivian Ly is an autistic self-advocate and the Executive Director of Autistics United Canada (formerly Canadian Autistics United), a grassroots disability rights organization that “works to improve the lives of autistic people. Vivian is currently a Behavioural Neuroscience student at SFU and a strong proponent of “Nothing about us, without us!”


Part 4: Stephany Berinstein

Stephany Berinstein – Occupational Therapist, Gastown Vocational Services, B.C.

StephanyBernstein is an Occupational Therapist and the Program Coordinator for Gastown Vocational Services, The Art Studios, and consults with SpectrumWorks. Stephany specializes in mental health and vocational rehabilitation. She leads a vocational rehabilitation program, using best practices to support mental wellness and meaningful, sustainable employment.


Part 5: Dr. Grace Iarocci

Dr. Grace Iarocci – Simon Fraser University, B.C.

Grace Iarocci, PhD., R. Psych. is a Professor of Psychology at Simon Fraser University, and Director of the Autism and Developmental Disorders Lab. She is a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Scholar.


Part 6: Dr. William Mandy

Dr. William Mandy – University College London, UK

Dr. William Mandy is a clinical psychologist and senior lecturer at University College London (UCL). His work aims to improve the recognition of autism, and to develop new interventions to help autistic people.


Part 7: Q&A

 

  1. Did friendships persist in the GNO program between girls in the program? (00:13 – 02:01)
  2. How can we improve the transition for teens and young adults who age out of the system, and may need community services and supports, and may need their parents involved? Are there research priorities that could help with this problem? (02:01 – 08:13)
  3. How should we as parents respond to professionals who question our daughters ASD diagnosis? (08:15 – 10:00)
  4. Who’s responsibility is it to educate professionals about autism? (10:00 – 15:40)
  5. Summing up Focus on Research 2018: Women and Girls with Autism – Anthony Bailey (15:40 – 21:50)

Sex Matters: The secondary impact of low prevalence for girls and women with autism

Filmed at ACT’s 14th Annual Focus on Research Conference – April 4, 2018

Dr. Jamison established Girls Night Out (GNO) in 2008 to provide socially valid and meaningful interventions designed specifically for females with autism and related developmental disabilities. Details of the program can be found here Girls Night Out: Lessons learned from a unique intervention for girls with autism

This second part of the keynote presentation focuses on research on the possible secondary impact on females with autism because of the discrepancy in rates of diagnosis between males and females. The concern is that missing females with autism is  exacerbating social-communication impairments and increasing risk for co-occurring mental health conditions.

Dr. Rene Jamison and Dr. Jessica Oeth Schuttler, Center for Child Health and Development (CCHD), University of Kansas Medical Center

Dr. Rene Jamison is an Associate Professor and licensed psychologist in pediatrics at the Center for Child Health and Development (CCHD), University of Kansas Medical Center. Her primary research focus is females with autism, identifying factors that contribute to social competence across development, and interventions to improve social-emotional health.

Dr. Jessica Oeth Schuttler is a licensed psychologist and clinical assistant professor also at the CCHD. She is the associate director for the Girls Night Out Program and key collaborator on related research projects, community partnership, and training efforts to create more inclusive communities.

Part 1: Introduction, Implications, Experiences of girls in the program


Part 2: Exploring the Social Profile of Females with Autism


Part 3: Cumulative Impact Across the Lifespan


Part 4: Sustaining & Expanding Ongoing Access


Part 5: Training & Dissemination of Best Practices


Part 6: Q&A

  1. How does your program work for girls that require a lot of support or are non-speaking? How do you make it as inclusive as you can when there’s such a wide range of needs across the spectrum? (Start-5:28)
  2. What would this program look like for younger girls aged 5-10 years old? (5:34-7:28)
  3. What interventions or methodlogies does GNO provide for the home environment? (7:28  -10:08)
  4. Has there been any thought about coming up with a weekend or week where social skills can be learned through cooking and other skill-building activities?(10:08- 11:54)
  5. How do you recruit neurotypical peers? Do you expect them to have previous knowledge of ASD? (11:55-15:43)

Girls Night Out: Lessons learned from a unique intervention for girls with autism

Filmed at ACT’s 14th Annual Focus on Research Conference – April 4, 2018

This presentation is followed by Sex Matters: The secondary impact of low prevalence for girls and women with autism.

Dr. Jamison established Girls Night Out (GNO) in 2008 to provide socially valid and meaningful interventions designed specifically for females with autism and related developmental disabilities. It is a positive and practical approach to giving girls with autism the opportunity to engage socially in a supportive environment.

In this presentation, Dr. Jamison and Dr. Oeth Schuttler explain the development of GNO. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of embedding the program within the community and during activities that social or self-care care skills would naturally occur. The role of trained peer volunteers in ensuring authentic opportunities for successful practice within realistic social settings is explained.

The second part of this keynote presentation, Sex Matters: The secondary impact of low prevalence for girls and women with autism, focuses on research examining the possible secondary impact on females with autism, of the discrepancy in rates of diagnosis between males and females. The concern is that missing females with autism is  exacerbating social-communication impairments and increasing risk for co-occurring mental health conditions.

Dr. Rene Jamison and Dr. Jessica Oeth Schuttler, Center for Child Health and Development (CCHD), University of Kansas Medical Center

Dr. Rene Jamison is an Associate Professor and licensed psychologist in pediatrics at the Center for Child Health and Development (CCHD), University of Kansas Medical Center. Her primary research focus is females with autism, identifying factors that contribute to social competence across development, and interventions to improve social-emotional health.

Dr. Jessica Oeth Schuttler is a licensed psychologist and clinical assistant professor also at the CCHD. She is the associate director for the Girls Night Out Program and key collaborator on related research projects, community partnership, and training efforts to create more inclusive communities.

Part 1: Introduction to Girls Night Out


Part 2: Sex Differences in ASD: Highlights and Implications


Part 3: What Makes GNO Unique?


Part 4: GNO Session Model


Part 5: Promoting Independence in Self-Care Skills


Part 6: Program Outcomes


Part 7: Q&A

 

  1. Could the girls set the agenda for activities they want to do? (00:00-00:40)
  2. Do you have any programs for people over 30? (00:40-01:40)
  3. What does the cost look like for participants and organizers in your program? Does it qualify for funding? (01:41-04:22)