Category Archives: Autism Videos at ACT

Including Students with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities in Schoolwide PBS: All Means ALL!

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Although the three-tier schoo-lwide positive behavior support (SW-PBS) model is intended to be applied to all students within a school, those with autism or other developmental disabilities are often excluded from Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions. This session examines some of the elements of school-wide PBS that are intended to benefit the full range of students within a school, with suggestions for including students with significant developmental and behavioral challenges.

Pat Mirenda, PhD, BCBA-D, University of British Columbia

Pat Mirenda is a Professor in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, and Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research and Collaboration in Autism (CIRCA) at the University of British Columbia. She teaches courses on augmentative and alternative communication, autism spectrum disorder, inclusive education, instructional techniques for students with significant learning challenges, and positive behavior support.

Dr. Mirenda has published over 150 research articles and chapters and presents frequently at international, national and regional conferences. She is the Principal Investigator for the Parent and Child Early (PACE) Coaching study that is examining the impact of community-based parent coaching for toddlers at risk for ASD.


Part 1: Introduction to the School-Wide System


Part 2: Setting and Teaching School-Wide Expectations


Part 3: Using Acknowledgement Systems and Visual Supports


Part 4: Discouraging Problem Behaviors


Part 5: Q & A

Questions:


Part 6: Tier 2 – Check-in Check-out (CICO) System


Part 7: Tier 3 – Individualized Behavior Support; Summary

PBS – Working Together to Support Children and Families

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Supporting students with disabilities and their families takes a village, including a range of professionals who must collaborate if students and families are to be provided with seamless service.  The purpose of this presentation is to discuss strategies that professionals can employ to work collaboratively, across disciplines, to enhance outcomes for students with disabilities.

Ilene Schwartz, PhD, BCBA-D, Professor and Chair, Special Education, University of Washington

Dr. Ilene Schwartz  is the Director of the Haring Center for Inclusive Education on the University of Washington campus, an interdisciplinary, research and training center focused on improving outcomes for children of all abilities. Her work focuses on autism, developing educational interventions for young children, and preparing staff to work with people with disabilities.

Dr. Schwartz has spoken to audiences around the world on topics such as “Understanding Autism”; “Why Inclusion is Important for all Children”, and “Getting an ‘A’ in ABA*”. Her TED talk, “The Power of Inclusive Education” has been viewed by thousands of people. Her recent book, “The Project DATA Model for Teaching Preschoolers with Autism**” describes her 20-year ground-breaking project designed to provide state of the art services for children with autism in public school settings. The Project DATA model is used across the country and internationally and is the standard of care for young children with autism in Washington State.


Part 1: Introduction and Objectives


Part 2: Meaningful Objectives, Inclusion, and the Four Non-Negotiables


Part 3: Non-Negotiable #1 – The Power of Positive Reinforcement


Part 4: Non-Negotiable #2 – Make Instruction Intentional


Part 5: Non-Negotiable #3 Rethinking Intensity – Embedded Teaching Strategies, Contingency Contracting, Environmental Arrangement, and Teaching for Independence


Part 6: Non-Negotiable #3 – Teach Students What to Do


Part 7: Non-Negotiable #4 – Data-based Decision Making


Part 8: Q & A

  • 0:00 – 2:32 You don’t have anecdotes listed as a type of data? Why is that?
  • 2:32 – 4:05 How do we keep visual schedules from taking up too much time?
  • 4:05 – 6:12 Do you have any suggestions for encouraging members of a team to collect data?
  • 6:13 – 7:06 How do you define keystone skills?

Family Centred, Culturally Responsive PBS:  A Multi-Method Case Study

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of a video learning stream on Positive Behavior Support.

Dr. Joseph Lucyshyn presents a multi-method study of family centered positive behavior support (FCPBS), designed to be culturally responsive to families raising a child with developmental disabilities. The presentation includes a definition of cultural competence and best practices in culturally responsive service delivery. Implications for behavior consultants working with families of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds are discussed. A fascinating case study demonstrates how the family was coached to use PBS strategies to transform their child’s ability to eat a nutritious diet and play with her sibling. There was a sustained positive effect on the family’s ability to develop other strategies to improve the child’s functional skills and to improve their quality of life.

Joseph Lucyshyn, PhD, BCBA-D, University of British Columbia

Dr. Joseph Lucyshyn is Associate Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education at UBC. A respected researcher, he has extensive experience working in collaboration with families and allied professionals to develop and implement family centered positive behavior support plans in home and community settings for children with autism and other developmental disabilities who engage in severe problem behavior. Dr. Lucyshyn has a particular interest in working with families from a variety of cultural backgrounds and how to ensure that they have access to culturally responsive PBS.

Dr. Lucyshyn’s Q&A can be viewed as part of the Providing Culturally Sensitive PBS to Families discussion page.

 

Part 1: The Need for Culturally Responsive PBS


Part 2: Culturally Responsive PBS with a Family of Taiwanese Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds


Part 3: Culturally Responsive PBS with a Family of Taiwanese Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds


Part 4: Qualitative Findings


Part 5: Culturally Responsive Practices, Cultural Humility, Study Limitations and Considerations for Future Research

 

Providing Culturally Sensitive PBS to Families: Discussion and Q&A

Filmed at Setting the Stage for Success: Positive Behavior Support in School, Home and Community – October 20, 2018

Part of ACT’s Positive Behavior Support Learning Stream

This panel was facilitated by Deborah Pugh, ACT – Autism Community Training’s  Executive Director. Prior to returning to Canada in the mid-90’s, Deborah worked as a journalist internationally, including six years living in Egypt. Since 2005, when ACT began its work providing family support, it has prioritized the needs of aboriginal and immigrant families in providing information resources, including ACT in Chinese and ACT in Punjabi, in addition to many language resources captured in the Autism Information Database.

Panel Participants

Joseph Lucyshyn, PhD, BCBA-D, Associate Professor, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, UBC

Dr. Joseph Lucyshyn has extensive experience working in collaboration with families and allied professionals to develop and implement family centered positive behavior support (FCPBS) plans in home and community settings for children with autism and other developmental disabilities who engage in severe problem behavior. He has authored publications in peer-reviewed journals including the Canadian Journal of School Psychology, Journal of Child and Family Studies, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, and Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities

Mariko Tachi, MEd, BCBA

Mariko Tachi has her BCBA and a Masters in Special Education from UBC. She has been providing in-home intervention based in ABA for children diagnosed with autism and their families in the Lower Mainland for the past decade. Since 2015, she has been travelling to Japan to provide interventions to families and has presented numerous workshops.

Noreen Dunn, MEd, BCBA

Noreen Dunn has been supporting children with ASD and other developmental disabilities in home, school, and community settings for over 13 years. A BCBA with a MEd in Special Education from UBC, Noreen has a keen interest in empowering and supporting families; she is currently working with a group of professionals in BC to make PBS more accessible to families from diverse cultural backgrounds.


Part 1: Q&A

 

  • 00:00 Do you ever find in your professional practice that you struggle with dealing with the black and whiteness of the ethical considerations when you’re trying to develop rapport with families from different cultures? For example, accepting tea?
  • 8:24 What do special needs approaches look like in Japan? Is it a similar PBS system compared to Canada/BC?
  • 10:19 What role can external professionals play in helping to bridge the gap in communications with schools?

Part 2: Q & A

 

  • 00:00 How can we teach cultural humility to professionals and school staff?
  • 04:23 Dr. Pat Mirenda discusses accepting tea for the purposes of cultural respect and sensitivity for BC ABA members.
  • 7:27 Is there research on if treatment is more effective if you speak the same language as the family you are working with?